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List of FAQ Sections : Definitions History Legalities Harm Culture Local Trends + Terms
  1. Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere
  2. What is medical marijuana?

    What is medical marijuana?

    This one seems obvious, though medical marijuana is still controversial and not perfectly defined since marijuana is not an approved medicine under any provision of Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For now, medical marijuana is marijuana used in the treatment of certain diseases and medical conditions in a handful of states. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) states that the cannabis plant contains active ingredients with the potential for relieving pain, controlling nausea, stimulating appetite, reducing inflammation and decreasing anxiety. Many medical marijuana cardholders use cannabis for other health reasons and the possible risks are still considered greater than the documented benefits. With or without supporting medical studies, seriously ill Californians and their primary caregivers currently have the right under state law to possess and cultivate cannabis for medical purposes. Further research on medical marijuana, its delivery systems, and possible effects are underway and clearly needed, especially when it comes to kids. Source: VC MJ Report
    Link somewhere

  3. Why was weed made illegal drug on in...

    Why was weed made illegal drug on in the first place?

    So,like most things in history, this answer is a complicated one. In order to understand how we got to this point with marijuana in the U.S., we must journey back to the 17th century. American production of hemp was encouraged by the government in the 17th century for the production of rope, sails, and clothing. In 1619, the Virginia Assembly passed legislation requiring every farmer to grow hemp. Hemp was exchanged as legal tender in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Maryland. Domestic production flourished until after the Civil War, when imports and other domestic materials replaced hemp for many purposes. In the late nineteenth century, marijuana became a popular ingredient in many medicinal products and was sold openly in public pharmacies. During the 19th century, hashish use became a fad in France and also, to some extent, in the U.S. In 1906 the U.S. passed the Pure Food and Drug Act, which required labeling of any cannabis contained in over-the-counter remedies. After the Mexican Revolution of 1910, Mexican immigrants flooded into the U.S., introducing to American culture the recreational use of marijuana. The drug became associated with the immigrants, and the fear and prejudice about the Spanish-speaking newcomers became associated with marijuana. Anti-drug campaigners warned against the encroaching "Marijuana Menace," and terrible crimes were attributed to marijuana and the Mexicans who used it. During the Great Depression, massive unemployment increased public resentment and fear of Mexican immigrants, escalating public and governmental concern about the problem of marijuana. This instigated a flurry of research and speculation, which linked the use of marijuana with violence, crime and other socially deviant behaviors, primarily committed by "racially inferior" or underclass communities. By 1931, 29 states had outlawed marijuana. In 1930 the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) was created and Harry J. Anslinger was named the first Commissioner and remained in that post until 1962. Commissioner Anslinger had a reputation of wanting to make a name for himself and his agency. In 1932 concern about the rising use of marijuana created pressure on the federal government to take action. Rather than promoting federal legislation, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics strongly encouraged state governments to accept responsibility for control of the problem by adopting the Uniform State Narcotic Act. In 1936, the propaganda film "Reefer Madness" was produced by the French director, Louis Gasnier. The Motion Pictures Association of America, composed of the major Hollywood studios, banned the showing of any narcotics in films. After a lurid national propaganda campaign against the "evil weed," Congress passed the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937. The statute effectively criminalized marijuana, restricting possession of the drug to individuals who paid an excise tax for certain authorized medical and industrial uses. In the 1950s, federal laws (Boggs Act, 1952; Narcotics Control Act, 1956) set mandatory sentences for drug-related offenses, including marijuana (ex.nfirst-offense marijuana possession carried a minimum sentence of 2-10 years with a fine of up to $20,000). Despite studies showing that marijuana, contrary to popular belief, did not induce violence, insanity or sex crimes, or other drug use, marijuana continued to be criminalized. Sourece
  4. My teen said he read all over the internet..

    My teen said he read all over the internet that weed was only made illegal because of racism, a shady Federal Bureau of Narcotics Commissioner, and corporate greed in the 1930’s. Could that be true? Why are there so many conspiracy theories about why marijuana was made illegal?

    There are indeed many (and easily debunked) marijuana conspiracies floating around internet chat rooms and message boards. It’s hard to find trustworthy sources as most of the conspiracies are published on “pro-legalization? and general “conspiracy? websites and forums. To be fair, though, there has been some research and history is complicated, with a lot of nuance lost or left out in the history books. Some of the critics of Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) Commissioner, Harry J. Anslinger, allege that he and the campaign against marijuana had a hidden agenda with DuPont petrochemical interests and newspaper publisher, William Randolph Hearst. Together they apparently created the highly sensational anti-marijuana campaign to eliminate hemp as an industrial competitor. Indeed, Anslinger did not himself consider marijuana a serious threat to American society until in the fourth year of his tenure (1934), at which point an anti-marijuana campaign, aimed at alarming the public, became his primary focus as part of the government's broader push to outlaw all recreational drugs. Historians and marijuana activists have pointed to chemical and various pharmaceutical companies that helped outlaw cannabis. The DuPont Chemical Co. had by far the most to lose in the marijuana wars of the 1930s. In February 1938, Popular Mechanics Magazine published its article describing hemp as “The New Billion-Dollar Crop,? that could be used for anything from “cellophane to dynamite,? and could even replace trees for producing paper, which was particularly alarming to Hearst, who held vast forestlands in California that produced the newsprint for his newspapers. The pharmaceutical companies could neither identify nor standardize cannabis dosages, and with cannabis, people could grow their own medicine and not have to purchase it from large companies. So, the idea was to prohibit the cultivation of hemp in America. Jack Herer, author of “The Emperor Wears No Clothes,? the seminal resource for marijuana and hemp information, explains that after the Spanish-American War in 1898, Hearst had developed a personal dislike and prejudice toward Mexicans, prompted by the “seizure of 800,000 acres of his prime Mexican timberland by the ‘marihuana’-smoking army of Pancho Villa.? Hearst, the chief purveyor of “yellow journalism? at the time, slapped terrifying headlines across his front pages: “Marihuana Makes Fiends of Boys in 30 Days? and “Hotel Clerk Identifies Marijuana Smoker as ‘Wild Gunman’ Arrested for Shootings.? There are plenty more details on this as well as other conspiracies about marijuana circulating online that can be found with a simple Google search. Before you believe anything research the sources and exercise good judgment.
    Source
  5. How is marijuana grown?

    How is marijuana grown?

    Well, they don’t call it “weed? for nothing. Marijuana is easily grown and is prolific indoors or out. Soil is required, except for cannabis grown with hydroponics (placing the roots in liquid nutrient solutions) or aeroponics (growing plants in an air or mist environment). Light can be natural (outdoor growing) or artificial (indoor growing). Watering frequency and amount is determined by many factors, including temperature and light, the age, size and stage of growth of the plant and the medium's ability to retain water. Where weed is still illegal growers use camouflage techniques to avert detection, such as mixing cannabis plants with other bushy, leafy species or they grow it indoors. Plants started outdoors late in the season do not grow as tall, attracting less attention when placed next to plants of similar or taller stature. Cultivating cannabis indoors is more complicated and expensive than growing outdoors, but it allows the cultivator complete control over the growing environment. Plants of any type can be grown faster indoors than out due to 24-hour light, additional atmospheric CO2, and controlled humidity, which allows freer CO2 respiration. Indoor growing has become increasingly common over the past decade because of the increased availability of equipment, seeds and instructions on how to cultivate. So-called grow-ops (growing operations, often located in grow houses) are seen by many marijuana enthusiasts as a much cheaper way to gain a steady, higher-quality supply of cannabis. Marijuana plants complete a growth cycle in an average of 45-90 days, depending on the strain of plant and the growing conditions. Therefore, a typical indoor cultivation can yield 3-4 harvest cycles per year. Conservatively, if there are 10 plants (there are generally more) in a modest indoor garden, yielding a minimal quarter pound of marijuana per plant per grow cycle, then at least 10 pounds of marijuana can be produced in one year. Finally, don’t quit your day job and kids…stay in school. Growing and selling marijuana in legalized states is a lot of work and it is not a get rich quick endeavor. The regulations are strict, confusing, and often changing. It takes more money to get started than buying a car. Finally, growers must deal with all kinds of personalities legal cannabis dispensaries don't pay very well. o Source: VC MJ Report Source
  • Why is marijuana called weed or pot?Open or Close

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere
  • Why is marijuana called weed or pot?Open or Close

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere
  • Why is marijuana called weed or pot?Open or Close

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere
  • Why is marijuana called weed or pot?Open or Close

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere
  • Why is marijuana called weed or pot?Open or Close

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere
  • Why is marijuana called weed or pot?Open or Close

    Why is marijuana called weed or pot?

    Marijuana is grown all around the world. This is one of the reasons the drug has so many names. Also, due to the illicit nature of the drug in most countries various code names and slang terms were created. Weed is a "slang" term for marijuana that most likely comes from "Mexican locoweed," a derogatory term for the marijuana brought over by Mexican immigrants in the early 1900s. The term “pot? came into use in America in the late 1930s. It is a shortening of the Spanish potiguaya or potaguaya that came from potación de guaya, a wine or brandy in which marijuana buds have been steeped. It literally means “the drink of grief.? There are literally hundreds of “slang? terms for marijuana, the act of smoking weed, and herbal varieties. For instance, if your teen mentioned the following words in a conversation with his or her friends would you know they might be talking about weed: ace, airplane, babysitter, black gold, broccoli, dew, fatty, haircut, kali, nail, red dirt, salad, tea, wheat, yellow submarine, zoom? Source: VC MJ Report, NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/07/14/201981025/the-mysterious-history-of-marijuana), http://www.theweedblog.com/list-of-marijuana-slang-terms/ Link somewhere